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Biology and Biochemistry Course Descriptions


Biochemistry Course Descriptions

BIOCH 405 Biochemistry (4)
Introductory course in the fundamentals of biological chemistry including a study of all phases of metabolism; problem solving in acid-base equilibria and buffers; and an introduction to the fundamentals of energetics of biochemical reactions and enzyme kinetics. This course fulfills the Molecular and Cellular Biology area requirement in the Biology major. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: BIOL 221, CHEM 201-202. (Spring)


Biology Course Descriptions

BIOL 110 Introduction to Biology I (4)
Designed to provide a broad background in biology as preparation for further studies in the discipline. Familiarizes the student with the major levels and unifying principles of biological organization. Topics covered include evolution, biodiversity and ecology. Lecture and lab. (Fall)

BIOL 111 Introduction to Biology II (4)
A continuation of Introduction to Biology I. Topics covered include cellular and subcellular structure and function, metabolic processes, and genetics. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in BIOL 110. (Spring)

BIOL 200 (BIOES 200) Invertebrate Zoology (4)
A comparative study of invertebrate animals, with a primary focus on the insects and other arthropods. This course provides a detailed study of the invertebrates: anatomy and physiology, behavior, and relationships with plants and other animals, including any medical importance to humans. This course fulfills the Ecology and Evolution area requirement in the Biology major. Integrated lecture and lab. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 -111. (Fall, even years)

BIOL 205 Biostatistics (3)
An introduction to experimental design and statistical analysis in Biology, Chemistry and Environmental Science. Students will also gain familiarity with graphing and statistical software. Topics include probability distributions, hypothesis testing, one- and two-sample tests, ANOVA, linear correlation, regression, contingency tables and non-parametric tests. Lecture only. Prerequisites: BIOL 110-111 or CHEM 101-102. (Fall, odd years)

BIOL 208 Nutrition (3)
This course introduces the basic concepts human nutrition, including basic biochemical principles of food, digestion and absorption. The course then delves into medical and public health concepts such as disease prevention and management in regards to nutrition. This course is offered as a hybrid class with classroom and on-line lectures, discussions, and exercises. Prerequisite: BIOL 110- 111 or permission of the Instructor. Textbook required. (Spring)

BIOL 209 Medical Terminology (2) Online
This online course covers medical terms related to all major body systems. Students will learn correct spelling, pronunciation, and building blocks of medical terminology including roots, prefixes, suffixes, and abbreviations. This course will offer students a strong grasp of the technical language of medicine in preparation for careers in medical science. Textbook required. (Spring)

BIOL 221 Genetics (4)
An introduction to the principles and mechanisms of heredity with an emphasis on classical Mendelian genetics. Other topics include molecular genetics and functional genomics. Elementary statistical methods will be employed with the laboratory component of the course focusing on experimental design using yeast as a model organism. This course fulfills the Molecular and Cellular area requirement in the Biology major. This course also fulfills the writing intensive requirement for the Veritas program. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: BIOL 110-111. (Fall, Spring)

BIOL 225 (BIOES 225) Environmental Science(4)
An introductory survey of the interdisciplinary field of environmental science, studying the biological, chemical and physical principles of ecosystem structure and function in order to understand and appreciate human impacts on natural systems. Topics include human population growth, preservation of biodiversity, sustainable agriculture, resource management, climate change, energy use and pollution. The laboratory will emphasize research techniques in environmental science and methods for environmental monitoring. This course fulfills the Ecology and Evolution area requirement in the Biology major. Prerequisites: BIOL 110-111 or permission of the Instructor. (Fall, even years)

BIOL 245 Epidemiology (4)
This is an introduction to the basic concepts of epidemiology including data collection, data interpretation, experimental design, bias, confounding variables, incidence, and prevalence. This course will build skills universally applicable to numerous fields of scientific research with regards to distilling the research question, experimental design, and data analysis. Students will have real discussions about how epidemiological data are used to: predict outbreaks and track outbreak sources; observe and analyze disease trends on a local, national, and global scale; and make policy with regards to public health. Lecture. Prerequisites: BIOL 221. (As needed)

BIOL 250 (BIOES 250) Animal Behavior (4)
An exploration of the interactions of animals with their environment and with other animals, within the framework of evolution and natural selection. Topics such as foraging behavior, learning and memory, navigation, anti-predator behavior, social behavior and communication will be studied in a wide range of animal taxa. Methodological approaches to observational and experimental studies of behavior both in the lab and in the field will be emphasized. This course fulfills the Ecology and Evolution area requirement in the Biology major. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: BIOL 221. (Spring, even years)

BIOL 298 Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
This course is the first of a two part sequence that examines the structure and function of human tissues, organs, and organ systems. Topics include the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous system. The accompanying laboratory will explore these topics in a dissection based approach, coupled with physiological lab experiments. This course fulfills the Organismal area requirement in the Biology major. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: BIOL 110-111, CHEM 101 (CHEM 101 can be taken concurrently). (Fall)

BIOL 299 Anatomy and Physiology II (4)
This course is the second of a two part sequence that examines the structure and function of human tissues, organs, and organ systems. Topics include the cardiovascular system, digestive system, endocrine system, urinary system, respiratory system, and reproductive system. The accompanying laboratory will explore these topics in a dissection based approach, coupled with physiological lab experiments. This course fulfills the Organismal area requirement in the Biology major. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or above in BIOL 298, CHEM 101. (Spring)

BIOL 300 Microbiology (4)
A fundamental course that examines microorganisms, their role in human disease and application in molecular biology. In this combined lab and lecture course, students will investigate growth, reproductive, metabolic and structural characteristics of bacteria and viruses. They will also study the classification of microbes and develop an understanding of their potential to cause human disease. This course fulfills the Organismal area requirement in the Biology major Integrated lecture and lab. Prerequisites: BIOL 110-111, CHEM 101-102. (Spring)

BIOL 304 Embryology (4)
A study of human embryology with emphasis on the fundamental development processes common to vertebrate embryos. Topics include gametogenesis, fertilization, and development of the embryo from zygote through the differentiation of the neural tube. The second half of the course is devoted to the development of selected human organ systems including the nervous system, sense organs, and the cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, and urogenital systems. Integrated lecture and lab. This course fulfills the Organismal area requirement in the Biology major Prerequisite: BIOL 221

BIOL 311 Pharmacology (4)
Introductory course in Pharmacology, a scientific discipline that focuses on how drugs affect biological systems. The pharmacological basis of therapeutics will be discussed in the context of the principles of drug action and the mechanism of action of representative agents, with emphasis on the molecular and cellular aspects. Major concepts to be explored include: pharmacokinetics, drug metabolism, dose-response relationships, and resistance. Other topics will discuss the chemistry, mechanism of action and pharmacologic action of drugs affecting the autonomic and central nervous systems, the cardiovascular, and renal systems, pathogenic microbes, cancer and hormones. This course fulfills the Organismal area requirement in the Biology major. Integrated lecture and lab. Prerequisites: BIOL 221 CHEM 201-202. (Spring, odd years)

BIOL 314 Virology (4)
This course is an introductory study of the major families of plant, bacterial, and animal viruses. Lecture topics include virus structure, replication cycles, use of viruses as research tools, and the role of viruses in disease. Prions, viroids, and virophage are also discussed. Laboratory utilizes 1) bacteriophage to emphasize the organismal aspects of viruses, and 2) animal virus to demonstrate the use of viruses in research and molecular biology. This course fulfills the Molecular and Cellular Biology area requirement in the Biology major Integrated lecture and lab. Prerequisites: BIOL 221 and CHEM 101-102. (Fall, odd years)

BIOL 315 Immunology (4)
An overview of specific and nonspecific immunity, structure and function of immunoglobulins, molecular basis of antibody diversity, T cell and B cell differentiation, cell-cell interactions in the immune response, humoral and cell-mediated immunity, lymphokines and mediators, immunogenetics and major histocompatibility complexes, complement, inflammation, hypersensitivity, autoimmune and immunodeficiency diseases, tumor immunology and transplantation immunology are among the topics discussed. This course fulfills the Molecular and Cellular Biology area requirement in the Biology major. Integrated lecture and lab. Prerequisites: BIOL 221 and CHEM 101-102. (Fall, even years)

BIOL 317 (BIOES 317) Methods in Aquatic Ecology (1)
In this lab-only course students will learn several basic techniques in aquatic biology and ecology. Each week students will study a different aspect of the biota, chemistry or physical aspects of local streams and rivers and summarize their findings in written reports. Prerequisites: BIOL 110-111 and CHEM 101-102. (Fall)

BIOL 325 (BIOES 325) Ecology (4)
Examines the principles of population and community ecology and explores the interactions affecting the distribution and abundance of organisms. The laboratory component focuses on learning basic ecological methods and applying these methods to design and implement in-depth studies of selected ecological problems. This course fulfills the Ecology and Evolution Biology area requirement in the Biology major Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: BIOL 221 or permission of the Instructor.(Fall, odd years).

BIOL 335 Pathophysiology (4)
Examines the molecular and cellular processes that enable cells to have certain structural and functional roles within an organism. Both microbial and animal cells will be studied with respect to chemical composition, function of organelles, cell division, gene expression and cellular interactions. The lab emphasizes techniques such as tissue culture, cellular transformation, DNA isolation and characterization, protein synthesis and recombinant DNA technology. This course fulfills the Organismal area requirement in the Biology major. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: BIOL 221, 298, 299. (Spring, even years)

BIOL 340 (BIOES 340) Conservation Biology (3)
Current and historical concepts in the field of conservation biology and wildlife management will be introduced and discussed. Students will learn about dynamics of small populations, the plight of endangered species, causes of extinction, and historical developments in conservation. Methods of conservation and preservation to protect species and habitat will be analyzed. Prerequisites: BIOL 221 or permission of the Instructor. (Spring, odd years)

BIOL 398 Independent Study (1-3)
Student selects a topic for study and surveys the literature, performs laboratory investigations or other activities and submits a written report. Permission of the Instructor, and Department Chair. (As needed)

BIOL 400 (BIOES 400) Toxicology (4)
A discussion of drugs and poisons, the chemicals that affect living systems. Students will study how such chemicals produce their effects, as well as the mechanisms of exposure and metabolism of biologically active chemicals, particularly those that result in chronic illness. Topics include pharmacology (study of medicines), physiology of toxicant effects and detoxification, and ecotoxicology (the behavior of toxicants in the environment). This course fulfills the Organismal area requirement in the Biology major. Lecture and lab
Prerequisites: BIOL 221 and CHEM 202 (or concurrent). (Spring, odd years)

BIOL 406 (BIOES 406) Evolution (4)
A study of evolutionary theory and the evolutionary history of life. Topics include the historical development of evolutionary theory, mechanisms of evolutionary change, population genetics and phylogenetics. Hypothesis testing and research techniques in evolutionary biology will also be explored. This course fulfills the Ecology and Evolution area requirement in the Biology major.
Prerequisites: BIOL 221 and CHEM 201-202 (or concurrent), Junior or senior standing required. (Spring, odd years)

BIOL 410 Seminar (1)
Study in depth of a topic of current interest. At each meeting one student presents a specific aspect of the topic to the group. All students are expected to read original literature and participate in discussion following the presentation. Required of all senior biology majors. BIOL 450 and BIHP 471 may be substituted for BIOL 410 with the permission of the department chair. (Fall and spring)

BIOL 415 (BIOES 415) Watershed Ecology (4)
This course offers a holistic and interdisciplinary exploration of aquatic ecosystems (lakes, streams and estuaries) with an emphasis on the linkages between land and water. Students will investigate the ecological relationships, the biological communities, the geochemical dynamics, the environmental pollution and management of local watersheds through readings, lecture and research. In the laboratory students will conduct research to answer novel questions, explore aquatic ecosystems first-hand on field trips, and learn important laboratory techniques for monitoring watersheds. This course fulfills the Ecology and Evolution area requirement in the Biology major.
Prerequisites: BIOL 221 and CHEM 101-102. (Spring, even years)

BIOL 420 Molecular and Cellular Biology (4)
This course examines the molecular and cellular processes that enable cells to have certain structural and functional roles within an organism. Both microbial and animal cells will be studied with respect to chemical composition, function of organelles, cell division, gene expression and cellular interactions. The lab emphasizes techniques such as tissue culture, cellular transformation, DNA isolation and characterization, protein synthesis and recombinant DNA technology. This course fulfills the Molecular and Cellular area requirement in the Biology major. Integrated lecture and lab
Prerequisites: BIOL 221 and CHEM 201. (Fall, odd years)

BIOL 435 Cancer Biology (4)
Utilizes lecture, experimentation and experimental/clinical scenarios to examine both the clinical and molecular aspects of tumorigenesis. Topics of discussion may include cancer development and progression, oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, cell cycle control, apoptosis, angiogenesis, cell migration/metastasis, and the immune response to cancer. Integrated lecture and lab. This course fulfills the molecular and cellular area requirement in the Biology major.
Prerequisites: BIOL 221 and CHEM 201 (Fall, even years)

BIOL 450 Undergraduate Research Experience (1-4)
An independent research project planned and executed by the student in conjunction with a faculty mentor; generally allied with the faculty mentor's own research. (Fall and spring, even years)

BIOL 480 Internship (1-4)
This course gives students the opportunity to gain practical experience in an off-campus program. The department chair must approve the nature of the work experience and the number of credits in advance. (As needed)

 
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